The word tutti is often quite loosely used. In a concerto, it can mean a passage for orchestra alone, and in choral music it signifies the chorus as opposed to soloists. A full orchestral tutti does not necessarily mean every single instrument is playing. However, the great majority of instruments will join in. To make a controlled climax using a tutti is a great skill in orchestration.

Beethoven

Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony 7 (Philharmonia/Klemperer
EMI 7 63354 2)
MI bb. 88-100:
Tutti. Note the horns at the top of the register.

Debussy

Claude Debussy: Prélude a l'après-midi d'un faune (Philharmonia/Cantelli
Testament SBT 1011)
bb. 63-74:
String melody in octaves. Note decorative harps and flutes.

Claude Debussy: La Mer (Philharmonia/Cantelli
Testament SBT 1011)
I Fig. 8:
Tune in muted trumpets.

Claude Debussy: La Mer (Philharmonia/Cantelli
Testament SBT 1011)
II Fig. 32:
String trills, woodwind in thirds and harp arpeggios.

Elgar

Edward Elgar: Symphony 1 (Philharmonia/Haitink
EMI CDC 7 47673 2)
Fig. 29:
Strings and woodwind in octaves, joined by strong brass chords.

Edward Elgar: Symphony 1 (Philharmonia/Haitink
EMI CDC 7 47673 2)
Fig. 50:
A high melody with a low countermelody.

Edward Elgar: Symphony 1 (Philharmonia/Haitink
EMI CDC 7 47673 2)
Fig. 143:
A typical tutti, with horns and trumpets dominating and leading to a tune for four horns in unison.

Holst

Gustav Holst: The Planets: Mars (Philharmonia/Gardiner
DG445 860-2)
3 bars after II:
Woodwind, horns and trumpets sustain chord. Brass, percussion and strings give out rhythm.

Gustav Holst: The Planets: Mars (Philharmonia/Gardiner
DG445 860-2)
6 after VII:
Woodwind, brass and strings build to a tutti. Note the use of piccolo to colour the top of the chord.

Gustav Holst: The Planets: Jupiter (Philharmonia/Gardiner
DG445 860-2)
10 before I:
Tune in low brass and woodwind, leading to tutti.

Lindberg

Magnus Lindberg: Cantigas (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony Classical SK 89810)
bb. 475-490:
Instrumental groups in layers, giving a tutti that is nevertheless clearly distinct rather than climactic.

Magnus Lindberg: Cantigas (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony Classical SK 89810)
bb. 522-525:
The ending of the piece. The final chord contains all 12 notes.

Magnus Lindberg: Fresco (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony Classical SK 89810)
bb. 174-177:
Tutti with bell tree, spring coil, mark tree and piano.

Magnus Lindberg: Fresco (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony Classical SK 89810)
bb. 422-433:
A tutti without percussion.

Magnus Lindberg: Fresco (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony Classical SK 89810)
bb. 454-467:
A full tutti.

Mahler

Gustav Mahler: Symphony 4 (Philharmonia/Zander
Telarc 2CD-80555)
MI 222-224:
A climax, underpinned by timps, tam-tam, bass drum and triangle, with sustained octaves in trumpets, horns and low woodwind and low strings, while the higher instruments fall away from the peak with descending passagework.

Gustav Mahler: Symphony 4 (Philharmonia/Zander
Telarc 2CD-80555)
MIII 314-320:
Tutti with timpani solo. The string texture at the start comes from rapid broken chords, played divisi with instruments moving in opposite directions. The harp binds this together with glissandi. The timp solo is played with two beaters, and doubled by accented double basses playing pizzicato and fortissimo.

Gustav Mahler: Symphony 5 (Philharmonia/Zander
Telarc 2CD-80569)
211-221:
High strings and piccolo balance brass and low woodwind.

Gustav Mahler: Symphony 5 (Philharmonia/Zander
Telarc 2CD-80569)
M3 b.683-704:
Horns, and then other brass, fill out the texture while woodwind and strings are in motion. Obbligato horn takes the solo at the end.

Gustav Mahler: Symphony 5 (Philharmonia/Zander
Telarc 2CD-80569)
M5 b.696-718:
Nonlegato strings in rhythmic unison with woodwinds, all decorating a brass melody in triads.

Ravel

Maurice Ravel: Bolero (Philharmonia/Maazel
EMI CDE 7 677812)
Fig. 16:
Note four-part pizzicato chords in strings, designed to resemble a guitar.

Saint-Saëns

Camille Saint-Saëns: Symphony 3 (Philharmonia/Yu
IMP 30366 00012)
MI 11-17 of G:
Flutes, oboes, cor anglais, clarinet violins and violas in unison, answered by brass , low strings and timps in harmony.

Camille Saint-Saëns: Symphony 3 (Philharmonia/Yu
IMP 30366 00012)
MIV 8 before T:
A tutti passage, with organ and string chords alternating with brass and full woodwind.

Camille Saint-Saëns: Symphony 3 (Philharmonia/Yu
IMP 30366 00012)
MIV letter GG:
The chords here are voiced according to the harmonic series (i.e. with an octave between the lowest notes, then intervals getting closer together the higher they are). This normally gives a very smooth sound, but the presence of the organ does a great deal to 'roughen' the texture.

Camille Saint-Saëns: Symphony 3 (Philharmonia/Yu
IMP 30366 00012)
MIV 7 before the end:
A characteristic use of piccolo in the tutti to brighten the sound and add definition.

Camille Saint-Saëns: Symphony 3 (Philharmonia/Yu
IMP 30366 00012)
MIV ending:
A full C major chord (preceded by timps) voiced according to the harmonic series. Strings have Cs in octaves, while the woodwind and brass spread the chord thus: C2-C3-G3-E4-C5-E5-G5-E6-G6-C7. The organ thickens the texture.

Sibelius

Jean Sibelius: Symphony 5 (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SMK 66234)
Molto moderato 4 before N:
Trombones, bassoons and horns sustain, strings play ascending arpeggios (alternating high and low strings), flutes oboes and clarinets in octaves. But the most prominent element here is the trumpet figure (chords on three instruments)

Jean Sibelius: Symphony 5 (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SMK 66234)
Molto moderato Piu Presto:
Although the sustained brass chords dominate, the very rapid motion in strings and woodwinds (with violins doubled by flutes and oboes) creates a thrilling ending to this section of the Symphony.

Jean Sibelius: Symphony 5 (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SMK 66234)
Allegro molto ending:
The celebrated six chords that end the symphony. Each chord is essentially the same voicing (although only the first and the last two include timps). Clarinet and flutes are pitched high to lend brilliance to the sound.

Stravinsky

Igor Stravinsky: Le Sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring) (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SK45796)
Fig. 75-78:
Building a climax. Note the double-tonguings in the brass.

Igor Stravinsky: Le Sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring) (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SK45796)
Fig. 138:
Tutti featuring a melody in four unison horns. Note the accomppanying trills in high clarinets with tremolando violins.

Igor Stravinsky: Le Sacre du printemps (The Rite of Spring) (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SK45796)
Fig. 142-145:
The opening of the celebrated 'Sacrificial Dance'. The metrical changes make this a challenging passage for the whole orchestra.

Igor Stravinsky: Petrouchka (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SK573274)
Fig. 36-40:
Tutti, with string chords and piano, triangle, cymbal and piccolo adding bright colour.

Igor Stravinsky: Petrouchka (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SK573274)
Fig. 72-73:
Piano, harp and xylophone add a brittle, percussive quality to the tutti.

Igor Stravinsky: Petrouchka (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SK573274)
Fig. 161-163:
Strings and winnd in thirds, punctuated by piano, harp, violas and clarinets.

Igor Stravinsky: Petrouchka (Philharmonia/Salonen
Sony SK573274)
Fig. 167-170:
A fuller version of the preceding example. The thirds, plus horn and piano attacks, make this passage sound bell-like.

Tchaikovsky

Peter Tchaikovsky: Symphony 5 (Philharmonia/Muti
EMI CZS 7 67314 2)
MII:
A typical climax.

Peter Tchaikovsky: Symphony 5 (Philharmonia/Muti
EMI CZS 7 67314 2)
MIV:
A tutti led by the brass.

The Orchestra: A User's Manual is a free resource and will remain so. It still receives between 8,000 and 16,000 unique visits per month from all over the world. See the testimonials. Thanks to all the donations, I have been able to create this responsive re-design. But the movies and sound clips recorded in 2004 do show their age. I would really like to re-record everything and add many more techniques, especially for solo and ensemble writing. I estimate this will cost around £30,000. If you know a source of such funds, please contact me: a.hugill [at] bathspa.ac.uk