THE ORCHESTRA: A USER'S MANUAL

This is the original 2005 site.
A re-designed, mobile friendly, site is HERE.
Please update your bookmarks.

Introduction Orchestration Orchestration Resources Historical Andrew Hugill
  Philharmonia

CELLO


Section: Strings
Transposing? No

Construction
Range
Bowing
Plucking
Left Hand
Mute/Harmonics
Chords
Extended
Player's Tips and Tricks

Links

 

Extended techniques

NAME
DESCRIPTION
NOTATION
LISTEN/VIEW
COMMENTS
microtones
intervals smaller than a semitone
notations vary, but the following examples seem typical of quartertones:

and the following typical of raised and lowered inflections:
microtones Microtones are tricky to pitch, and can easily sound like 'out of tune' playing, particularly if attempted by an entire section at once!
scordatura tuning
retuning the strings
a verbal instruction to retune, possibly with an additional staff to show new tunings
scordatura tuning
Rare, but possible on the cello. Restrict retunings to a tone, preferably flattening.
tap instrument
tap the body of the instrument with fingers or with the bow
verbal instruction, with x-shaped noteheads for extended passages
tapping Tapping the body or the shoulder of the cello with knuckles or palm is acceptable. Using bow or other beaters is NOT!
play behind bridge
playing the strings between the bridge and the tailpiece
verbal instruction, with x-shaped noteheads if necessary
playing behind bridge The standard bowing and plucking techniques may be used for this effect.
bow tailpiece
bowing the tailpiece
verbal instruction
bowing the tailpiece Soft, ghostly sound.
'silent' fingering
fingering pitches with the left hand without bowing or plucking the strings
verbal instruction
'silent' fingering Rarely used. Quiet.