THE ORCHESTRA: A USER'S MANUAL

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Introduction Orchestration Orchestration Resources Historical Andrew Hugill
  Philharmonia

FLUTES


Section: Woodwind
Transposing? Picc, Alto and Bass: Yes
C Flute: No

Construction
Range
Articulations
Effects
Extended
Player's Tips and Tricks

Links

Extended techniques

general comments about extended techniques

NAME
DESCRIPTION
NOTATION
LISTEN/VIEW
COMMENTS
alternative fingerings
different ways of fingering notes
verbal instruction and fingering diagram
alternative fingerings There is no need to specify fingerings normally, so the use of alternative fingerings is generally left to the player.
low hoots
South American-style sound
normal, but with verbal instruction
low hoots The end barrel is pulled out and the mouthpiecce turned inwards towards the player. An interesting effect, but with little carrying power.
microtones
intervals smaller than a semitone
notations vary, but the following examples seem typical of quartertones:

and the following typical of raised and lowered inflections:

microtones

Microtones are especially difficult on the piccolo, where the holes are entirely covered by keys. They are mostly produced using lip inflection.
multiphonics
playing chords
write the bottom note of the chord and the word 'chord' above

multiphonics

 
key slaps
slapping instrument keys

x-shaped noteheads and verbal instruction

key slaps The larger the flute, the more effective and pitched the key slap.
whistle tones
blowing a very small amount of air into the flute
verbal instruction
whistle tones Although this is a quiet and somewhat uncontrollable effect, it has more carrying power than might be supposed.