((((a star that appears to us today
Like a fire whose twinkling light has penetrated through,
Will, when water has covered all the bare earth
Except for peaks as yet unclimbed,
Already be one of the extinct worlds...
All fires go out, within us as in nature:-
On the envelopes which one can only obtain with a counter-signature
The sender has extinguished each seal with a puff;
- Old age puts out certain fires: tireless, the young cock
Takes all-comers, pullets, hens at point-of-lay, old chickens...
The mature cockerel uses his discretion; - inside cowards
Is a flame which never fails to burn when danger is present
(((((A burning fire this, but an illusion; no-one would ever run from it
Or see its embers, and the hare
Would never notice it making the frogs run faster))))); fever
Makes a fire which goes out, either when the patient dies
Or when, the fever at its peak and looking dangerous,
One's shining eyes and deep blisters,
- Fever makes even adults grow, it's a well-known fact -
Gradually transform into blooming convalesence,
And ravenous hunger drives one to eat like a hundred men,
With a tongue which is once more good and red;
The fire which patiently diminishes a candle
Goes out; - like the hammer that falls when one sells
A building at an auction; - as under a gust of wind,
When a king is saved from a burning building,
A fire which the heir who would benefit from his death
Started secretly to see who was on his side;
- As when noisily leaving a distant pistol
Held by a champion whose shots are always accurate,
A well-aimed bullet splits a lock of hair or a fly;
- As when a reader in bed (((((his back higher than his ears,
Forehead in hands, fascination keeping him awake,)))))
Devours some poignant passage
In which an unmarried mother (((((who everybody thinks is well-behaved
As long as her affair remains a secret)))))
Who (((((ready to join with hers his plenteous destiny)))))
Is loved by a high-level financier,
A young employee of whom, a year after the sin was committed,
Takes his child for a secret baptism,
Which will not allow him to sleep, is alas! frustrated
Because, for a laugh, someone has planted in the candlestick
A trick candle invisibly rigged
So as not to burn any more than its tip;
- As when he has let fly a quick sneeze
Followed by fervent prayers to God to bless him,
The man with a cold; the sacred flame of genius
Dies when its possessor grows senile
(((((A flame which, however big this name or that pseudonym,
Is not held in the same regard by everybody;
- In the same way that a man has only one puppet in the bazaar
And its price-tag is attached;))))) on his wall Balthazar
Saw written in ineradicable letters
Three words of living flame... then they disappeared;
The fire in one's eyes goes out when one reaches the age when, tooth by tooth,
Hair by hair, without any drastic shock, without any accident,
By the erosion of time, one's head empties;))))



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1.
Everything progresses: as at the moment when, calling the hens,
Those wise early-to-bedders, in to roost,
The sun sinks in the west, the rich man (money
Improves his position of privilege;
The elegant dunce is sure to be outstripped in a college
Whose crest, through pride, the elbows of the student-body
Have vigorously rubbed to to a shining finish;
To a rich suicide one gives a mass:
It is hard to die without a De Profundis);
Has the wicks of his old lamps re-lit,
A gesture which electric light has rendered out-of-date;
The motorcar, causing the dropping of sticks,
Has brought animal transport into disrepute,
- Since which sparrows have had a hard time;
And are those awkward catapults a patch on cannon?







2.
What things one has to wait for, alas! the moment of the
Splash of a pebble which one has dropped down a well,
Public adulations - the celebrity having died
Only in death acquires the right to have his statue and his street -
The end when in cold water a sugar-cube is dissolving,
For the insomniac those patches of light on the ceiling
Which announce dawn and its splendours,
In all good books the removal of the obstacle
Which separates the hero from perfect happiness,
The young wife, when her womb is not becoming heavy,
The lapel of a uniform for a scarlet ribbon,
For the thunder, when the crash comes heavily
Only one minute after a feeble flash of lightning!







3.
Nobody is without an ambitious dream;
The worker sees himself dictating, during a strike,
(Nowadays on uses reason and everybody, eye on his goal,
((We all have one; while the nape of his neck,
Bared to facilitate the action of the blade,
Is attached to his spine for another fifteen minutes,
Dreaming: "He loses his prisoner - and this often happens -
Who holds him the tightest", (((in fact, inconsequentialities
Can help the long-term prisoner to break gaol,
Like the cheese charmed from the bill of the crow
- It is often best to keep silent;)))
Even the murderer has a goal: escape;))
Whatever this ideal might be: to earn a large salary,
To have children, to have an abundant harvest,
Or to slow his heartbeat at will to achieve enlightenment,
Realises that in order to succeed it is better to think, to act,
Than to make - hard worker, barren wife,
Reaper or invalid - a wish at the moment when
A shooting-star falls across the sky;),
Tired of seeing the bourgeois live off his sweat,
(Often Paul suffered and worked for Peter;
Vespucci exploited Columbus's efforts;
And it is to bedeck a finger or a chemise with pearls
That an oyster works so hard;) terms to his employer;
The whore in her attic dreams of riding in a coach;
To see in his hands the amethyst and the crook
Is a dream dear to every young priest.







4.
How the significance of words change depending upon their context!
Eclair means "a flash in the sky accompanied by a bang"
Or "reflection from the blade of a knife";
Corbeille, when found in an epithalamium
Depicts the precious kingdom of the spirit,
Gives also "collection of old manuscripts"; noyau
Means "comet" here and "cherry" there;
Revolution can correspond to "crisis
In which people say of an obeyed prince: "we want him"
Or "sudden shock to the nervous system";
Bras shifts from "armchair" to "sea"; suite from "chapter" to "king";
Conduite from "the way in which man stagnates" to "braid";
Blanc from "cube of chalk for grinding" to "civilized";
Banc from "treacherous rocks where death is in the air" to "uncomfortable seat";
Champignon is used either for "to eat sloppily" or "elegant stand";
"That which a man who is hammering must have"
And "a number which oozes prestige" are contained in clou;
"He who, to clean himself up, runs a bath"
Is in savon, or "that which an athlete under orders listens for";
"A sin which keeps one awake at night"
Or "pigtail to tickle the neck" in repentir;
"Trait by which one habitually lies from childhood"
In baton or "supreme military honour";
"Emplumed roaster of men and possessor of
A bow" in naturel or "a simple happy lack
Of learning; in paradis "a smelly ball" or "the Heavens,
That beautiful flowery place sung about by pious
Choristers"; "a potted delicacy for robust
Gastronomes" or "incongruous written sorrow" in pate;
"Scientific choice of comestibles made
To please" in regime or "the way in which one is led
By the clique to become a conformist";
"A cry by which, the one mocking the other, an alter ego
Imitates you" or "inserted paragraph" in echo;
Finally, faute depicts the slip which means that she is burdened
Who will never be seen by him again, or the mistake that a student
Geared to precision commits in his homework;
Well now, should one decide never to see someone again
Because a grammatical error has appeared in that person's translation?







5.
A trick which is worth as much as these, for novelty value:
To induce a hen to sit on an egg
Which was actually laid by a duck,
To see the hen trembling (around whom clucking,
Trying to get at the duck which is foreign to the brood,
Menacing, beaks at the ready, is all the farmyard)
Whilst the duckling pecks at her ankle;
Frightening an old lady
(A feeble one in whom the taste for celibacy
Was formed by fear of a drunken husband who would beat her,
Like the famous example of Bluebeard's widow)
By attaching a burning rag to her cat's tail
And making it run in terror towards her.




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